Mail travel advice to Cyprus that sucks

Posted on 2013/09/26 by

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Go on! Follow the Mail travel advice and be a sucker, just to be on the cheap side of things.

One reason is that you can’t fly there direct from the UK, but have to go via the Turkish mainland.
However, over the past decade, border crossings have opened up over the Green Line that snakes across the island, so many Britons heading to the north now fly into the south, to which there are more numerous and often cheaper non-stop flights.

On the eve of World Tourism Day – a time for reflection on tourism´s responsibility and commitment in ensuring a sustainable future, we are confronted with a customer and media environment that cultivates unsustainable postures fixed in the short term gains and complete disregard for responsible and culturally sustainable tourism exchanges.

cyprus map

Larnaca Landings to Nicosia border crossings

The pursuit of cheap and free in tourism – some would like us to believe that it’s bliss.  

But in essence, buying or selling cheap, doesn’t pay the bills.  The infra-structure set in place for secure and hassle-free airport travel, great point-to-point airline connections, the incentive schemes in place for airline travel – how else does a destination balance it’s payments if it’s not with customer transactions and care for the tourism value chain.

If travel on the cheap raises the question of how do travellers actually give to a destination, when does the moment of ‘giving back’ ever come?

As if the last six months of  media frenzy about Cyprus were not enough, going beyond the economic balancing act, the matter hits a more sensible spot of social responsibility.  Without wanting to send anyone on a guilt trip, the question we put forward in the current context is the following: at what stage do travellers become intimate partners in building sustainable futures in tourism.

We believe there is a place to start and appreciation for geography is a first aspect to demonstrate some type of consideration.  Yes, placing Cyprus on the map is a challenge and local promoting authorities  bear their fair share of responsibility of the existing levels of ignorance.

Historic Town Centre of Nicosia, endangered heritage

You may well know that Nicosia is not a port city, it may be the capital and divided city, but it’s not a port.  But if you’ve confused Larnaca for Nicosia and with the historical fact that it used to be an airport – then it can’t be that in your head you can have any esteem for a land and people that welcomes you.

A word of advice if you’re  visiting as a ‘journalist’, since you’re going to benefit from a nation’s infra-structure and welcoming and for your hassle-free border crossing, you could at least save yourself the commentary about Euro-anywhere looks in busy commercial streets.

Mind you, being blinded by shop-front lights is little excuse for not being slightly sensitive to the fact that old town quarters of Nicosia are among the 7 most endangered Europa Nostra Heritage sites, by this we mean, if you’re going to border cross, you can’t even side step the marking testimonial of war and division.

The question is why would you want to?  To make and fake the 75 minutes sell of the travel agent or journalist, that crossing half of the island is a breeze?

Dear traveler, refrain marketing rush time trap and we’re going save you the legalities of ports of entry to Cyprus and the conditions for visiting the occupied territories as recommended by the Mail.

As a member of the travel community we can’t but be optimistic upon the opportunity that we still have to reflect on how best to contribute individually and collectively, for more equitable exchanges in Tourism and heightened respect for a local heritage preservation for future generations to enjoy.

The point being, that since sustainability and conservation do come at a price, it’s only legitimate to insist that there be funding schemes orientated from within, and funding from tourism to ensure that heritage remains a key asset for future generations.

Further Reading: Sustainable Tourism Travel – The duty of the industry

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